Web Page HTML/CSS Template
Webstyle produced NavBar
 
Twitter & Facebook
 INTER-NETWORKING
 
 
    LINK CATEGORIES
   *International
   Arts & Culture
   Business & Internet
   Education & Training
   Government & Politics
   Health
   Online Resources
   Organisations
   People & Society
    RELEVANT LINKS
 
 
   
 
  View NEWS
 2011-06-24 12:27 am Back to NEWS
‘Nkole lying’ — State House


By Times Reporter

Former Task Force cahirperson Max Nkole

State House has said the allegation by former Task Force on Corruption chairperson Maxwell Nkole that President Rupiah Banda interferes with the delivery of justice in the country is demeaning to the Head of State and insulting to the judiciary.

Special assistant to the president for Press and public relations, Dickson Jere, said in a statement yesterday that President Banda believed in the doctrine of separation of powers, which underpinned the independence of the judiciary from the other two arms of Government – the executive and legislature.

Mr Jere said Mr Nkole should avail himself with the necessary evidence before releasing false and libellous statements to the media, as he did in yesterday’s Post newspaper.

“At no time did President Banda promise to terminate Dr Katele Kalumba’s corruption cases in return for political support in Chiengi.

“Likening the case of Dr Kalumba to that of the late second Republican president, Dr Frederick Chiluba, is doing injustice to the memory of the late president,” he said.

Mr Jere said Zambia was currently mourning Dr Chiluba, and dragging his name through the mud, as Mr Nkole and others were trying to do, was an affront to the country’s culture and tradition.

He said for the record, Dr Chiluba faced the courts and was acquitted on corruption charges by the High Court and not President Banda.

“The president does not appeal acquittal cases to a higher court. The Constitution of the Republic of Zambia is very clear on the appeal process. It empowers the Director of Public Prosecutions to appeal to a higher court based on his legal opinion,” reads the statement.

Mr Jere said the courts had convicted and sentenced a number of the president’s political colleagues and the conviction of Solomon Musonda, the former Health deputy minisiter, was one such example which demonstrated the independence of the courts.

Some former service and security chiefs had also been convicted by the courts and at no time did President Banda attempt to reverse the convictions.

Mr Jere said the accused defended themselves in courts and had, in some cases, been acquitted.

He said Mr Nkole was a bitter and frustrated man who tended to blame his failure to run the disbanded task force on corruption on others.

“As a former police officer, he must understand that Zambia is one of the few African countries which have upheld the independence of the judiciary. Let Mr Nkole learn to respect our courts of law,” Mr Jere said.



 
    MEMBER OPTIONS
 
Username
Password
Member Signup
Forgot Password
 
 
    SPONSORED LINKS
 
 
   
 DIRECTORY HOME
MEMBER LOGIN · EDITOR LOGIN · MEMBER SIGNUP · EDITOR SIGNUP
NEW LINKS · POPULAR LINKS · LINK TO US · ADD A LINK · NEWS
TERMS OF USE · PRIVACY POLICY · LEGAL POLICY · CONTACT US